Motorola Mobility

MotoACTV Sport Portal

Whether it be a personalized fitness tracker providing insights on how to improve your health, an athlete monitoring system to track the performance of an entire soccer team in realtime, or crowdsourcing the activity of scuba divers for scientific research, the tracking and analysis of activity-based data became a breakthrough industry over the past decade. I am one of those fortunate enough to have worked on products relating to all the scenarios described above.

While at Isobar, global digital innovation agency, I took on the role of UX and Team Lead in the design and development of the MotoACTV Sport Portal – the online companion to the Motorola MotoACTV smart watch range.

The MotoACTV GPS Fitness Tracker and MP3 Player

Motorola MotoACTV at a glance
  • A fitness smart watch first introduced in 2011
  • MotoACTV ecosystem included additional sensors like heart rate monitors and bike speed and cadence sensors
  • Training analysis and scheduling provided via web portal
  • Partnered with the Carmichael Training System to provide workout plans for runners and cyclists
  • Precursor to the Moro 360 smart watch range
Background

Isobar was initially hired to partner with Motorola Mobility to develop the MotoACTV Sport Portal – a web-based destination for athletes – as they developed the 2nd generation of their MotoACTV smartwatch range. The web portal provided athletes with additional features to analyze data captured and to set custom training schedules.

Along with improving the analysis of the existing activity modes of the device – walking, outdoor running, treadmill running, elliptical, indoor biking, and outdoor cycling – the new device range introduced golf tracking as an additional activity mode.

In parallel with the work being done for the 2nd generation device, we also partnered with the Motorola team to explore passive wellness data collection (steps, calories burned, heart rate data etc.) which, while implemented into the subsequent MotoACTV Lifetracker product range, was eventually implemented fully in the Moto 360 moto body app.

My Role

My role was to lead the UX design and act as the internal Isobar team lead. I also acted as the primary client-facing member of the design team where I partnered closely with Motorola’s on-device UI design and engineering leads to facilitate and lead workshops t0 derive requirements for the portal and lead client presentations.

Planning – Workout Builder

The Workout Builder was a new feature we introduced to the portal’s existing workout planning functionality. With the new feature users were able to create workout routines that supported both multiple workout activities, as well as, different activity types, such as running and cycling.

The workout builder feature was the precursor to ultimately being able to support training planning for triathlon athletes within the portal.

Settings – Fitness Zones

Fitness Zones were where users could set their heart rate, pace and power zones and view their fit tests. The portal supported a basic set of zone settings together with zone settings supporting the Carmichael Training System and the ability to set custom zone values.

Wellness – Lifetracker

I was also tasked with directing the research, strategy, and conceptual design phases for the user experience of an expanded activity set that would constitute the wellness tracking capabilities of the MotoACTV Lifetracker product. Additional features of this product release included the tracking of activities such as steps taken, calories burned, sleep analysis, the logging of your current mood, and your daily water and supplement consumption amounts. This data was then aggregated to define an overall daily life score. User could then set themselves daily goals to improve their wellness based on recommendations provided through the application.

MotoACTV II  – Golf Edition

The MotoACTV Golf Edition smartwatch included a “virtual caddy” that enabled golfers to keep their scorecard, track their clubs, and record other key statistics of their round such as marking down how many greens they had hit in regulation.

Users were then able to analyze their game after the round by syncing their watch with their online account to view each shot taken to complete the course. With access to over 20,00 of the most popular courses nationwide, the web portal mapped users GPS movements around the course to a Google map for each course played. In addition to analyzing their individual round, users could invite their playing partners to view their previous rounds on the same course. Similarly, users could even compare their round to that of professional golfers who had played the same course.